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EDITORIAL Table of Contents   
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1
African Journal of Paediatric Surgery: Between legacies of the past and challenges for the future


African Journal of Paediatric Surgery, C/O Paediatric Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Jos University Teaching Hospital, P.M.B. 2076, Jos. Plateau State, Nigeria

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Date of Web Publication23-Jan-2010
 

How to cite this article:
Uba FA. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery: Between legacies of the past and challenges for the future. Afr J Paediatr Surg 2010;7:1

How to cite this URL:
Uba FA. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery: Between legacies of the past and challenges for the future. Afr J Paediatr Surg [serial online] 2010 [cited 2020 Aug 4];7:1. Available from: http://www.afrjpaedsurg.org/text.asp?2010/7/1/1/59348
Medical education and training are under threat, and surgical undergraduate education is under siege, in many developing countries due to dwindling economies and lack of motivation among the trainers. [1] The ever-increasing demand for medical education and rapid turnover of graduates have significantly affected the scope and teaching resources available to students.

At postgraduate level, there are increasing concerns regarding compromised training and teaching with resultant poor skills and incompetence in patient management [2] in many centres in the developing countries because of poor remuneration, lack of incentives and drives. This is compounded by a demanding workload, increasing personal debt, lack of quality family time, changing lifestyles, and diminished job opportunities on completion of training. [3] Unless these vexing issues of surgical training are adequately addressed, [4] there is likely to be a declining interest in surgical training and specialization by medical students [5] and young doctors.

In reversing this decline, academic surgery needs to embrace changing global trends and respond creatively to new realities and responsibilities of communication and education, research and patient care, now, more than ever. Academic surgeons must lead the effort to awaken and renew interest in highlighting the essential role of surgery to the health of the population.

One specialty in need of academic communication to flourish in Africa is Paediatric Surgery. Compared with developed countries, paediatric surgery is at best in its infancy in most centres in Africa, where it has remained the privilege of only a few countries, although the specialty has been practiced and taught in the continent for decades. [6],[2] The absence of a journal home for paediatric surgery in Africa became a major obstacle to the growth of the specialty.

Thus, the inception of African Journal of Paediatric Surgery (AJPS) helped to fill the void. Within a few years, the AJPS has become the leading paediatric surgery journal in Africa, and within a short time achieved listing in MEDLINE/PubMed, a mark of increasing reputation in the scientific community.

It is strongly desirous that many more centres in Africa should embrace and institutionalize paediatric surgery specialty. Stakeholders should take the advantage of available journals on paediatric surgery to effectively communicate and interact within the specialty to foster rapid growth of the discipline on the continent, bearing in mind that the successful practice of paediatric surgery of the future in Africa will have to integrate professional skills with its historical missions of patient care, research, teaching [7] and communication to face emerging challenges.

 
   References Top

1.Krige JE. Departments of Surgery in South Africa- legacies of the past, challenges for the future. S Afr J Surg 2004;42:76-7.  Back to cited text no. 1  [PUBMED]    
2.Louw JH. The history of medicine in South Africa. Trans Coll Med South Africa 1976;20:113-28.  Back to cited text no. 2      
3.Winter TA, Painter ML, Slack M. An assessment of registrars and their training programmes at the University of Cape Town teaching hospitals. S Afr Med J 1990;77:304-6.  Back to cited text no. 3  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
4.Dent DM, Benatar SR. Dissatisfaction of registrars in training at the University of Cape Town teaching hospitals. S Afr Med J 1990;77:275-6.  Back to cited text no. 4  [PUBMED]    
5.Polk HC Jr. The declining interest in surgical careers, the primary care mirage, and concerns about contemporary undergraduate surgical education. Am J Surg 1999;178:177-9.  Back to cited text no. 5  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
6.Madu PT. Paediatric surgery in Nigeria: Past, present and future. Afr J Paediatr Surg 2009;6:137-42  Back to cited text no. 6  [PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
7.Souba WW. The arrhythmia of change: palpitations for academic medical centers. J Surg Res 2000;89:1-6.  Back to cited text no. 7  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  

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Correspondence Address:
Francis A Uba
African Journal of Paediatric Surgery, C/O Paediatric Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Jos University Teaching Hospital, P.M.B. 2076, Jos. Plateau State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0189-6725.59348

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